top of page
Red Mangalitsa piglets_©Royal Mangalitsa.com_Mangalica_DSC2512

 Old Books / Helpful Link /
Publications 

A lot of the books here came from: https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org

Hungarian

Articles about the Mangalitsa breed

THE WORLD OF ANIMALS

Alfred Brehm 1876

1. The pig 

Strat from page 540

Pig breeding in the Hungarian History

A MANGALICA SERTÉS TARTÁSA 

Gödöllő 2007 

Pallas's Great Lexicon

Different pig breeds

Mangalica:

The pig as it once was

Powerpoint

Swine in America

Old Pig breeds in America.png

A Text-book for the Breeder,

Feeder & Student

" I have not great learning, but what little I have acquired was paid for from the proceeds of some wheat and hogs.—Brnjamin Hurrison

By F. D'.' Coburii Secretary Kansas Department of Agriculture

Read the book here:

Old Books

and Articles about

Pig breeding 

ROMAN FARM MANAGEMENT

The treatises of

CATO and VARRO

done into English, with notes of modern instances,

by a Virginia farmer.

Cato, Marcus Porcius, 234 B.C.-149 B.C. 

BREEDS OF HOGS

 The best crops to grow for hogs, and other data

by W.H. Dalrymple. 1910

W. H. (William Haddock), 1856-1925.

BREEDS OF SWINE 

by F.G Ashbrook 1917

Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, 1917

The lincolnshire Curly Coat

Extinct breed of the UK

journalofministr2941grea_0087 Lincolnshire Curly Coat boar 1922.jpg

THE LINCOLNSHIRE CURLY COATED PIG.

by

SANDERS SPENCER.

 

THERE appears to be little doubt as to the locality in which the Lincolnshire Curly Coated Pig originated, since in no other county than Lincolnshire is there found a breed of pig of a similar type and character. It is true that some forty or fifty years ago there was to be found in County Cork an occasional pig with very curly hair, but this was of quite a different character to the curly hair of the Lincolnshire pig as it was much softer and more like wool than hair. Further, the County Cork type of pig did not seem to possess that robust constitution which is so characteristic of the Lincolnshire pig. It had more the appearance of a pig which had been so interbred as to lose its constitution and which had entered on its last stage. 

 

Read the PDF  here:

TREATISE ON THE

BREEDING OF SWINE, AND

CURING OF BACON

 TREATISE ON THE BREEDING OF SWINE, AND CURING OF BACON;.png

A

TREATISE ON THE

BREEDING OF SWINE, AND

CURING OF BACON

LONGMAN & CO. LONDON.

1811.

All departments of husbandry require knowledge and tare in conducting them. Some of them, however, are attended with more labour and expense than others, and also more slowly return to the husbandman a profit.

 

 No sort of live-stock will, in a given time, and with a small outlay,

make a greater return than swine. Every man that has a house and yard may derive benefit by having some of them, providing the number kept be not disproportioned to the means possessed for comfortably subsisting them.

Read the book here:

Castration 
of young pigs

Castration of young pigs.png

CASTRATION OF YOUNG PIS

 

FRANK G. ASHBROOK
Junior Animal Husbandman, Animal Husbandry Division

FARMERS  Bl LLETIN 780
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Contribution from the Bureau of Animal Industry A. D. MELVIN, Chief

Washington, D. C.

November, 1916

This publication deals with castration, or the removal of the essentialorgansofmalepigs. Theobjectsofcastrationaretopre- vent reproduction, to increase fattening propensity, to better the qualityofthemeatoftheanimal,andtohelpinsuredocility.

 

Every farmer should be competent to castrate pigs, as the losses from the operation are as a rule not very heavy and could be reduced by exer- cising care and attention.

Read the PDF here:

Biggle Swine Book

Biggle swine book _ Philadelphia, Wilmer Atkinson co, 1912.jpg

MUCH OLD AND MORE NEW HOG KNOWLEDGE, ARRANGED IN ALTERNATE SREAKS  OF FAT AND LEAN

BY 

JACOB BIGGLE

“ The pig, the rent payer of Europe, the mortgage lifter of Anierica.”’

PHILADELPHIA WILMER ATKINSON CO. 1912

Hog husbandry is undergoing changes. New feeding methods have come into vogue; methods based on a better understanding of foods

and food effects. New breeds of hogs have come into existence; breeds resulting from intelligent and persistent effort to adapt animal to locality, and to the foods of that locality, and to special market requirements.

Read the PDF  here:

LIPPINCOTT'S FARM MANUALS

Productive swine husbandry 1915.jpg

PRODUCTIVE SWINE HUSBANDRY

By GEORGE E. DAY

1915

In the preparation of material for this book, the author has worked with a twofold purpose,—namely, to prepare a book which will serve as a text-book for agricultural students, and to place at the disposal of the busy farmer a reference book which will give him, in concise form, the findings of the best experiment stations in regard to the problems involved in the; successful handling of swine.

As to whether these objects have been attained, to the public must be the judge.

In the treatment of the different breeds of swine, and other topics where favouritism or partiality is possible, it has been the purpose of the writer to state the exact truth and give " both sides of the case."

Read the book here:

The Hog Book

The Hog Book 1911.jpg

Embodying the experience of fifty

years in the practical handling of swine in the American corn-belt

I only give in the following pages that which I have received. It has all been gained through the experience of a life devoted almost entirely to the live stock business. I believe that this common- sense review of my experience will be of value, but To my fellow-breeders and feeders I dedicate this 

record of my experience, gained during 50 years spent in breeding and handling the great American hog. It is my hope that they may derive benefit from it and that its publication will ultimately result in the betterment of breeds and types and increase profits to producers.

In conclusion, I would remind you, no matter what or how much you read, study, hear or see, the hard knocks of practical experience and close association with Mother Nature are the makers of successful swine raisers.

Read the book here:

Rational Pig Keeping

Tational pig keeping to ensure profit London 1896.jpg

London, William A. May,

1896

The large number of questions relating to Pig Keeping which are asked in the inquiry columns of agricultural newspapers indicate that there are many pig keepers and would-be pig keepers who require an inexpensive but comprehensive book as a guide in purchasing and managing their pigs. This book contains all that is best in the writers experience of their management. 

The illustrations of breeds are specially prepared, as are some of the designs for housing. Thanks, however, are due to Messrs. Richmond & Chandler, Barford & Perkins, and Hill & Smith, for illustrations they have kindly supplied.

Read the book here:

A Manual of the Hog

a Manual of the Hog 1877.jpg

IMPORTANCE OF THE SUBJECT.

1877

From the remotest ages of the past to the present time, the hog has been an object of special interest to the human race, in all of its stages of social, moral and intellectual development, from the rude barbarian to the most enlightened. He contributes more largely to the food supply of the human race than any other one animal.

The hog is a cosmopolite, equally at home in all except the frigid zones, though his original habitat was in comparatively warm climates.

The reader will better understand the importance of the subject under discussion by reference to statistics.

Read the book here:

Sal Vet Swine Book

Sal Vet swine book 1921.jpg

Successful Hog Raising

(Written for the “Sal-Vet” Swine Book) By Hon. F. D. COBURN, Topeka, Kan.

1921

The most serious problem with which hog raisers have to contend today, isthe health of their animals. Statistics compiled by the Department of Agriculture show that the loss from the diseases which attack swine amounts to many millions of dollars every year. 

This book is compiled with the earnest desire that in it you will find much that is new and practical and if it shall add something to your knowledge of how best to breed, feed and care for your hogs I shall be amply re- paid for all the labor and expense involved.

Read the book here:

Pigs in landscape management

History, ecology, practice

Schweine in der Landschaftspflege – Geschichte, Ökologie, Praxis.png

Pigs in landscape management

– History, ecology, practice

(GERMAN)

Agricultural animals such as sheep, goats and cattle are playing an increasingly important role in landscape management. The use of domestic pigs in landscape management, however, is still not very widespread.

The specialist conference “Landscape management with pastured pigs” of the Alfred Toepfer Academy for Nature Conservation on May 19, 2005, chaired by Dr. Renate Strohschneider, served to provide information about the latest findings regarding the use of these animals and the consequences for species and landscape protection.

 

 The conference benefited from the fact that the content could be referred to a BMBF-funded project “Free-range pig farming as part of landscape conservation”. 

Read the PDF  here:

The British Breeds and Development of the Modern Pig Industry

Berkshire old breed BPA.jpg

Perspective Chapter - The Role of British Breeds and Breeders in the Development of the Modern International Pig Industry

By Marcus Bates

Pigs were farmed in the forests of Britain before becoming more confined from the 13th century onwards. Importations of breeds from around the world and an interest in animal breeding created a wide variety of native breeds.

 

The establishment of the National Pig Breeders Association and its herdbooks in 1884 led to breeding improvement. Over the next century, British breeding pigs were exported to all corners of the globe. 

Here you can read the development of these breeds and see them in pictures

Read the PDF  here:

A Hungarian Example with Mangalica Pig Breed

Reka line Bator Pure Mangalitsa. LCC IMG_5017_edited.jpg

Tracing the Local Breeds in an Outdoor System – A Hungarian Example with Mangalica Pig Breed

Pig farming is largely characterized by closed, large-scale housing technology. These systems are driven by resource efficiency. In intensive technologies, humans control almost completely. However, there are pig farming systems where humans have just little control. These free-range technologies are called organic pig farming systems in which the quality characteristics of the produced meat sold on a premium price are primary. We present the practical difficulties that are challenging in implementing precision pig farming. We characterize the data science methods that determine the reliability our conclusions. This chapter describes the literature on the behavior and production results of pigs, social aspects, and the possibilities of the certified pig meat supply chain.

Read the PDF  here:

Schweinerassen der Welt – Entstehungsgeschichte Teil 1

Schweinerassen / Pig breeds development

Schon seit etwa 10 000 Jahren hält der Mensch gezähmte Schweine, ausgehend vom asiatischen Teil der Türkei. 2000 Jahre später zogen sie mit ihren Haustieren westwärts und brachen die domestizierte Form des Schweines bis nach Europa. 

(GERMAN)

Wildschweine - Urahn des Hausschweines

Die Wildschweine gliedern sich in verschiedene Unterarten, die sich in der Körpergröße unterscheiden. Dabei ist auffällig, dass die Größe sich von West nach Ost verringert. Die Farbzeichnung ist ein weiteres Merkmal. Während die ost- und südostasiatischen Schweine eine Backenbinde (heller Streifen) besitzen, fehlt diese bei den europäischen Arten.

 

Die aus Ost- und Südeuropa stammenden Schweine hatten einen großen Einfluss, auf die (süd-)deutsche Hausschweinform. Vor allem die kleineren aufrechtgetragenen Ohren und die geringere Körpergröße waren charakteristisch.

Auch im Mittelmeerraum gab es vor allem dunkel pigmentierte Schweine, die später eine wichtige Rolle bei der Entstehung der englischen Rassezucht einnahmen.

Als letzte Tierart war es das Schwein, das Haustier, welches an unterschiedlichen Orten der Erde vom Menschen domestiziert wurde. 

Diese “Hausschweine” sahen den heutigen modernen Hybriden nicht besonders ähnlich. Z. B. war das Schwein der Germanen grobknochig, mit langem Kopf, hochbeinig mit einem gebogenen Rücken, wie ein Karpfen (Scrofa-Typ). Vergleichbar mit dem europäischen Wildschwein oder dem ausgestorbenen Weideschwein.

Read the PDF  here:

The Old and the New Pig Breeds
Eben van Tonder
24 December 2019

Old Irish pig.png

In this article, I look at the well-known English breeds what the English pig looked like before they were crossed with Chinese, the result of crossing and some of the characteristics of good sows and boars.

Old English and Irish Pigs

Harris has a great sketch of an old English and old Irish pig. 

Early breeders did not immediately find a market for the improved breeds which was done between old English sows with Chinese boars. 

 

From the offspring of these animals, the farmer will then select the ones with the character traits that are most desirable and the rest will become ham or bacon.

There were many common village pigs that were crossed with Chinese pigs.  One wealthy landowner would buy the Chinese boar and “rent” him out to villagers to fertalise their sows.  In this way, pigs from a village or a county developed similar characteristics.

The best known English breed at the time was the Berkshire.  One of the other well-known breeds is the White’s.

It is said that businessmen drove the development of the Berkshire as opposed to lovers of pigs and pig breeds.  Agents of wealthy businessmen in the US bought the animals based on their ability to do well at shows and not for any inherent functionally beneficial characteristics. 

The buyers were looking for pigs that are short, turned up snout, a heavy jowl, thick neck, wide shoulders, and a fat back.

Read the PDF  here:

bottom of page